Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

Posts tagged “county Kilkenny

Native Irish Wild flowers, Early Marsh Orchid , Ballykeefe, county Kilkenny

Early Marsh Orchid
Dactylorhiza incarnata
Magairlín mór
Family: Orchidaceae
Ballykeeffe, Kilkenny
Nigel Borrington

Flowering May-July. Tuberous perennial. Native.

Flowers usually white, pink or purple. (Ssp. coccinea has reddish flowers.)
Narrow, cylindrical flower-spike, lower bracts longer than flowers. Sides of lip strongly reflexed, weakly 3-lobed, 2 U-shaped loops enclosing dotted patches. Leaves erect, keeled, usually unspotted. (Ssp. cruenta, leaves spotted both sides) Hollow stem. Very variable, links to subspecies below. Identifications by Ian Denholm

Damp calcareous soils, meadows, fens, marshes, dune-slacks. Also slightly acidic bogs, damp heaths. Declining due to habitat loss.


Nature without words (Bumble bees)- Solo images (Ballykeefe nature reserve, county Kilkenny)

A bumble bee collecting nectar
Ballykeefe nature reserve
County Kilkenny
Nigel Borrington


5 Images for May, Wednesday

Green Veined White Butterfly, feeding from a herb Robert flower, County Kilkenny


5 images for May, Monday

Cow slips, Ballykeeffe, County Kilkenny


Reflections in the mud , Kilkenny landscape images

Reflections in the mud Landscape images from county Kilkenny Nigel Borrington

Reflections in the mud
Landscape images from county Kilkenny
Nigel Borrington

I often find that when I am out walking, it is the most unexpected things That capture my attention and I just have to capture with my camera. I am never sure if anyone else would even find the same things the slightest bit interesting ?

This Morning there was a thick fog sitting on all our local fields, it had rained none stop for the three days before hand and the early morning sun was just about able to break through the mist. I was walking past the open gate of a field and noticed the sun reflecting into the muddy puddles created by the farmer tractor, I just had to capture its amazing light !!

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European passage tombs ( Knockroe, county Kilkenny and Kilmartin, Argyll, Scotland )

Knockroe passage tomb

Knockroe, county Kilkenny

Knockroe http://www.megalithicireland.com/Knockroe%20Passage%20Tomb.html

kilmartin 0366

Kilmartin, Argyll, Scotland

Kilmartin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilmartin_Glen

A link through time

These two mystical European locations stand two hundred and fifteen miles apart, Knockroe is in county Kilkenny republic of Ireland and the other, Kilmartin is in Argyll, Scotland, about 15 miles south of Oban.

Knockroe panel

kilmartin 0361

The reason I displaying these images in the same post is simply to highlight something that only occurred to me when one year I happened to visit them only weeks apart. The fact is you could view these two sites individually and study them by themselves all you like, however you would be missing something very important!

Knockroe Markings

The people’s who created these sites shared the same time period and clearly the same beliefs and culture. They lived in Europe both in Ireland and Scotland located in the Geographical British Isles; however some 5500 years ago they knew nothing of recent nations and nationalism , of national borders or even the concept of a European nation.

Knockroe scetch

Both monuments are passage tombs, placed for their dead to be remembered, they both also contain elements for marking the passing of the year and its seasons, by measuring the movement of the sun and the moon.

The structures in these places along with the cultural function they served is identical, to me this shows that these people traveled the seas and not only shared goods and beliefs they in fact where the same peoples. They did not just get on with each other through trade they were each other as brother and sister, mother and father, family and friends.

When they knew nothing of modern boundaries and divisions, what else could they be?

These same people who traveled from one place to another in order to expand their options and abilities did not in any shape or form see themselves as English or Scottish or Irish they were family to each other and nothing more or less!


County Kilkenny Landscape images, south east Ireland through a lens

Kilkenny Landscape Images Nigel Borrington

Kilkenny Landscape Images
Nigel Borrington

Summertime in County Kilkenny can bring some wonderful changes to the surrounding landscape and today I just want to share a gallery of images taken during the following months.

It a great time of year with so much to look forward to ……

County Kilkenny Landscape Gallery

Kilkenny Landscape Images 01

Kilkenny Landscape Images 02

Kilkenny Landscape Images 03

Kilkenny Landscape Images 04

Kilkenny Landscape Images 06

Kilkenny Landscape Images 07


Cuckoo-flower / Lady’s Smock , Irish Nature Photography

Cuckoo-flower / Lady's Smock  Nigel Borrington

Cuckoo-flower / Lady’s Smock
Nigel Borrington

In late springtime here in county Kilkenny – Ireland, I always notice when the wild flower come out.

Some of the most noticeable are the Cuckoo flowers, they grow at the side of rivers and along damp woodland paths.

I always feel like summer has started in full when I first see them …..

Cuckoo-flower / Lady’s Smock

Cardamine pratensis
Biolar gréagáin
Family: Brassicaceae
Flowering time: March-June. Perennial. Native.

Cuckoo flowers 2

Large white to pinkish-mauve flowers. Yellow anthers. Colour depends
on habitat, pink-mauve on dryer ground. Fruit with long or short style.
Basal leaves round / oval, in rosette. Stem leaves narrow-lanceolate.
Variable plant, sometimes with runners. Height: To 60 cm

Very frequent. Damp meadows and lawns, stream sides, open moist woodland.


The Ice house , Woodstock Gardens , County Kilkenny

The Ice House, Woodstock Gardens, Co. Kilkenny Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

The Ice House,
Woodstock Gardens, Co. Kilkenny
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Woodstock Gardens, County Kilkenny – dates back to 1737.

The Gardens and the remains of the old house are one of county Kilkenny’s most popular locations, located above the River Nore and the small town of Inistioge.

The Ice house is most likely less known, as it is located on the banks of the river Nore on the very limits of the grounds, it is however one of the best preserved ICE houses you could wish to find.

The details on the information board nearby are a little unclear as to when this building was constructed but it is considered to be sometime in the 1800’s, it was used for visitors to the smaller river side lodge, named the “Red House”.

The ‘Red House’ was a hunting lodge that at the time could only be accessed via boat along the river, today however you can find this location via a half an hour walk from the town of Inistioge.

A General History of ice houses

Irish Ice house 1

The Romans were the first to build ice houses, though not very widely in the UK and Not at all in Ireland. Ice houses were usually built close to sources of winter ice, such as freshwater lakes. In the 17th century, grand country houses followed the fashion of having one built, and then ice houses fell from fashion until about the late 18th century.

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Uses of ice houses

Irish Ice house 3

On country estates from about 1660, the ice was mainly used not to chill food, but for its own sake: for ice creams and increasingly popular desserts such as syllabubs.

Meat and fish did not need to be preserved on a large estate because they could simply be caught from estate lakes and ponds when needed. Ice was also used for medicinal purposes: to treat fever and inflammation. At one time, a common prescription for indigestion was being told to suck on ice.

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Woodstock House,

now a ruin, was for generations the home to the Tighe family. In 1737, the twenty-six-year-old Sir William Fownes inherited the estate and commissioned an elegant mansion, completed in 1745. He hoped to establish himself with the gentry of the area and to impress the 2nd Viscount Duncannon, soon to become the first Earl of Bessborough, whose daughter Elisabeth he planned to marry. Over the next forty-five years, Woodstock was the background to a series of dramas that led to the deaths of William, Elisabeth and their son-in-law William Tighe.Woodstock house Kilkenny 4

Many gardens and walks were laid out between 1840 and 1900 by another William Tighe and his wife Lady Louisa Lennox.[1] The gardens contain many exotic plants from Asia and South America, including the Monkey Puzzle tree and the Noble Fir tree which form two of the walks in the gardens,[2] as well as specimens of the Coast Redwood.

In 1921, the property was occupied by the Black and Tans and Auxiliaries, which caused much local resentment, and then by troops of the Free State Army, who were withdrawn from the premises during the Irish Civil War, on 1 July 1922. The house, left unguarded, was burnt down the next day, and remains a derelict empty shell, overgrown with vegetation

The River Nore, County Kilkenny, located below the Ice House. Nigel Borrington

The River Nore, County Kilkenny,
located below the Ice House.
Nigel Borrington


Irish Landscape Photography – The River Suir at Mooncoin , County Kilkenny

Fishing boats on teh River Suir Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Fishing boats on teh River Suir
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington


Fishing on the River suir

A walk along the river Suir, at Mooncoin, County Kilkenny is one of the best river walks in the south east of Ireland.

The river is used by many local people during the year but the fisher men are probably it’s most common visitors, the River is renowned for its game angling, holding both salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta).

The Boat men of the suir 1

I have taken many photographs of the fishermen here over the years, alone with their boats, used for their fishing. These boats ( all made locally ) are used more like punts as they have a completely flat bottom and are moved along the river using a pole.