Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

photography review

Irish Photographer Francis Browne and his lucky escape from the RMS Titanic …..

Francis Browne's pictures of the Titanic April 14th 1912

Francis Browne’s pictures of the Titanic
April 14th 1912

Francis Browne’s Finest Pictures

In 1985 an Edward O’Donnell was searching in the basement at the Irishjesuit Provincial’s House when he came across a large black metal trunk, in it he found a large colletion of negative albums, photographs and most amazingly of all an album containing photographs of Titanic’s voyage.

All these photographs were the work of Francis Browne who died in 1960 and was almost forgotten by this time. Subsequent investigations revealed he had enjoyed worldwide fame in 1912 when his photographs of the Titanic’s journey to Cobh were published worldwide. He had travelled first class to Cobh having been given a ticket by his uncle Robert Browne, Bishop of Cloyne. His remarkable pictures proved to be unique.

Titanic 05

So it was that Frank was presented with a first class ticket for the Maiden Voyage of the Titanic to bring him as far as Cobh. The morning of the 12th.April 1912 he arrived at Waterloo Station in London to catch the Titanic Special. He immediately started taking photographs, first recording the train journey and then life aboard the Titanic on the initial section of the voyage. Having made friends with a wealthy American family he was offered a ticket for the remaining part of the journey and no doubt excitedly telegraphed a request for permission to go on to New York, to which he received the terse response “Get Off That Ship——Provincial!” That telegram not only saved Frank’s life but also meant that this unique record of the voyage was saved for posterity and guaranteed overnight fame for Frank Browne.

Browne later described the event as “the only time holy obedience saved a man’s life.”

“Get Off That Ship——Provincial!” – I guess many have wondered about this instruction ? , its almost prophetic in its nature – I guess we will never know how or why it was such a strong and clear order . I think it relates to the fact that while many embraced the new-world of 1912 technology, many also stood in fear of it and in this case clearly for good reason.

Frank Browne , April 1912 – Titanic Gallery

Titanic 06

Titanic 05

Titanic 04

Titanic 03

Titanic 02


When Dorothea Lange Visited Ireland in 1954

Dorothea Lange A Chat at the O’Halloran Farm [Ireland]

Dorothea Lange A Chat at the O’Halloran Farm [Ireland]

For myself, Dorothea Lange is right at the top of my list of most loved Portrait photographers, I find her images just amazing even after all the years that have passed since she took them.

It is amazing the range of her photography work and telling just how brave and out there she was to capture the vast majority of her subjects. During the great depression in the USA she captured the massive Migrant of farmers from east to west (Dorothea Lange : Migrant Farm Families ).

I have studied much of her great depression images and I am in love and have total admiration with them as a body of work, a hugely important historic study !!!!

One body of Dorothea’s work that I have until recently not looked at, is here images of 1950’s Ireland, I have shared a couple here, living in Ireland for this last ten years or so I have visited and photographed many of the locations she visited – so its wonderful to see these images and amazing to compare just how much life and these places has changed.

I am only starting to collect some books and look at the images from her 1954 Irish visit, however as you cam see the b
lack and white film images she took at just amazing !!!!

Dorothea Lange Michael Kenneally on His 30 Acres [Ireland]

Dorothea Lange Michael Kenneally on His 30 Acres [Ireland]


Using Classic Lenses, Yashica DX 35mm f2.8

Yashica 35mm m42 Using classic lenses Nigel Borrigton

Yashica 35mm m42
Using classic lenses
Nigel Borrigton

Yashica DX 35mm f2.8, M42 Lens

Over the years I have collected a few classic camera lenses, the Yashica f35mm f2.8 m42 lens has to be one of my most valued and liked.

Back in the 1960’s this lens would have cost a good amount of cash as it was at the top of Yashica’s Slr lens range, the main reason for this being that it had the then New DX coating and a 35mm focus length was becoming very valued for 35mm film camera.

Yashica 35mm m42  02

I use this lens a lot, not all the time but its always at hand if I need it, I think you can see from the images below why.

If I use it on a dx sensor camera it provides for a 50mm focus length, a length that I like a lot for framing landscapes. As for the famed DX coating, well I think that you can see form the images below that it still works very well. The colors and the contrast in these images ( taken last week ), are just great. The images taken facing right at the sun show just how little flair this lens produces.

Gallery

County Kilkenny Landscape Photography 2015 1

County Kilkenny Landscape Photography 2015 2

County Kilkenny Landscape Photography 2015 3


Image processing using Andriod Tablet Software

Duncannon Beach  Landscape processed with Spadspeed Nigel Borrington

Duncannon Beach
Landscape processed with Spadspeed
Nigel Borrington

For almost all of my digital image processing I use a combination of Photoshop or Paintshop-pro and aftershots-pro software, these applications are perfect to getting the best possible quality from you images. However what about times when you want to be a little more creative with your images, processing them in a more artistic fashion and then sending them to your facebook or blog moments after you have taken them.

Last Saturday I visited the coastal town of Duncannon in county Wexford and took some beach images using both a Fujifilm x100 and a Nuxus 7 Andriod Tablet with and used an app that I downloaded sometime back called Snapspeed to process them . This app is well known and used but I had not used it while at a location before, so decided to give it a go !!!

The images here are all processed using some of the filters and packages available in Spanspeed and I was impressed with how they looked after processing.

I think if your a landscape painter who paints raw outside this little app could give you some great ideas as to how you may end up paint the scene in-front of you. I also love the final images, this application is both great fun and also I feel could well be used to produce some great design images.

Snapspeed Gallery

Duncannon Beach 3

Duncannon Beach 2

Duncannon Beach 1


What to do with Green in the landscape ? – using Black and White.

Green and black and white landscape 5
Green in the Landscape, using Black and white
Irish Landscape photography : Nigel Borrington

One of my all-time favourite photographers James Ravilious, once while being interviewed by the BBC said about the colour Green in the Landscape :

“England is a very green country, and “greenness” creates a monotonal view, and one that it’s difficult to achieve much contrast or colour gradation in. Transposing to black and white allows you a richer tone palatte, and to draw attention to the subject more subtly. Black and white contains a bright silver to deep black tone range in landscape images and thus turns a green flat image into a wonderful tonal picture”

This monochrome effect in landscape images is something that has always interested me, Landscape photographers like Ravilious used Black and white film, which when developed correctly in the dark room produces the wonderful tones he talks about.

River Torridge at Sunrise © James Ravilious

I have worked for a long time to both find landscape subjects and black and white processes that can help in getting me close to the same results.

KIlkenny landscape photography woodstock 2
Woodstock country gardens, County Kilkenny, Photography : Nigel Borrington
Black and white image, processed in photoshop CS6 and taken with a fujifilm X100

This blog contains many of the black and white landscape images I have taken and in the Gallery below I want to use some local Landscape images to show, how landscapes taken in colour can look when processed in Black and white.

I have placed the colour images first followed by the black and white images, have a good look at them, see what you think and comment if you like.

Some photographers don’t get black and white others love it and will only produce images in monochrome.

Green or Black and white Gallery

Green landscape 2

Black and white landscape 2

Green landscape 4

Black and white landscape 4

Green landscape 3

Black and white landscape 3

Green landscape 6

Black and white landscape 6

Green landscape 5

Black and white landscape 5


What is Lens Bokeh ?

Bokeh 6
Led lights and Lens Bokeh
Nigel Borrington

What is Bokeh

Wiki have a great description here : Lens Bokeh

“In photography, bokeh is the aesthetic quality of the blur, in out-of-focus areas of an image. Bokeh has been defined as “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light”.

However, differences in lens aberrations and aperture shape cause some lens designs to blur the image in a way that is pleasing to the eye, while others produce blurring that is unpleasant or distracting.

Bokeh is often most visible around small background highlights, such as specular reflections and light sources, which is why it is often associated with such areas.

However, bokeh is not limited to highlights; blur occurs in all out-of-focus regions of the image.”

I have been looking for a way to test this feature of my lenses for a little time, then at Christmas we put up some little led lamps as below. So using two different lenses one a Nikon 50mm f1.8 lens and A Mamiya 45mm f2.8 lens I took some images of the lights, with the lens as out of focus as I could get them.

I think that the images below clearly show the effects that are described in the Wiki link, seeing clearly the effects of the number of aperture blades and their shape.

The Nikon lens as seven blade but they are not curved , the Mamiya lens blades are curved. You can clearly see that the shapes created are very different.

Lens Bokeh examples

Bokeh 3
Led light used for examples below
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Mamiya Sekor lens

Bokeh 6

Bokeh 4

Bokeh 2.
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Nikom AIS Lens

Bokeh 1

Bokeh 5


Getting close in the landscape

Mirror lenses 3
Following the fence
Irish Landscape photography : Nigel Borrington

Mirror lenses 1

Way back in 1986 I purchased a Tamron SP500 f8 Mirror (Telephoto) lens from a camera shop in London, it was second hand and cost around £150 back then.

The lens is reviewed very well here : Photozone review

I came across this lens again while sorting out some equipment last week and could not resist taking some images with it, so I put it onto my Sigma x3 camera and took a walk with both through some local fields.

I am not going to reviews the lens as such here as this is done so well in the above review, what I would say however is that this is a manual focus lens that is able and very capable of producing some very detailed and delicate images.

I really enjoyed using it again, if you are looking for a lens that is quick to use then this lens is not for you. If you take your time while creating your images however then this lens offers some very different and interesting results. I very much liked the shallow depth of field, there is something about the design in a mirror lens that produces a very find focus area in the image results.

I also felt that the combination of this lens alongside the sigma x3 sensor, produced some of the closest results to using film that I have noticed while using a digital camera.

The lens is very sharp, it produces wonderful colour and contrast, focuses down to 1.7 meters from the nearest subject and has a very shallow depth of field through out its focus range. Photographers spend a lifetime looking for lenses that have these features along with very distinctive results, if you can give this lens the time to learn how best to use it, I feel you will love it !

These lenses are often for sale on Ebay, if you want to purchases one and try one out !

Gallery

Mirror lenses 2

Mirror lenses 3

Mirror lenses 4

Mirror lenses 5


A car boot sale camera – sigma dp1

Sigma Dp1 front

I found this little camera at the kilkenny car boot sale a couple of weekends ago, it just looked up at me from one of the tables and had a price tag of €50 with the Voigtlander viewfinder.

Its the original 2009 sigma DP1 , (follow the link for details). The stall it was on was a charity stall collecting for Africa so I felt I just had to put my hand in my pockets and hand over the €50.

I had always wanted to try out one of these little cameras but when new they cost a good €800, the reviews never put it in great light but I always had a feeling that it was a little better then the reviewers reported them to be. The somewhat bad reviews have left the second hand prices low.

Sigma Dp1 back

Last week I put the camera in my bag along with some other of my kit and on the way home stopped off at a local tourist venue. The images below are three images from about fifty I took just as a test of this little camera. I have to say just like the reviews always said its a little old fashioned to use and the poor LCD screen ( in the sun ) makes you use the external viewfinder a lot but it still felt very good to use, a little like using a good film compact camera. The focus is good and the controls and functions are simple to find and quick to change if your use to any high end compact system.

Image quality

So what about the results, well the big reason I had to try this camera was for its sensor, ( A Foveon X3 sensor ) You can read all the details from the link, its the only sensor on the market that captures pure colour at each and everyone of its mega-pixels. All other sensors are monochrome only, with a filter that cuts out (Red, green and blue in turn) for each of a set of three mega-pixel locations in a row, repeated. Thus they do not record colour but only a signal that some colour has come through a filter to them.

The sigma sensor however records pure colour in full and at the intensity at which it reaches the pixel point. This system is as close to film as it comes.

The images below show the results and I have to say I am very impressed, quality wise they are sharp and the colour is wonderful but it was when I did a colour conversion to black and white my eyes were truly opened, if you have done any black and white conversion from raw digital files you will know the work you need to do to get some true film like monochrome contrast back into your images. Not here. The images even at default setting are just wonderful.

I have started each of the below image pairs with the black and white conversion from the original colour image.

Sigma Dp1 sample 1 black and white
Sigma Dp1, iso50

The contrast is just wonderful here, yet nothing is lost between the black of the trees and the sun on the grass…

Sigma Dp1 sample 1
Sigma Dp1, iso50

The green in the sun-lit grass, along with its detail is fully retained, yet the sky behind the trees has retained a light blue colour and not just overexposed into white.

Sigma Dp1 sample 2 black and white
Sigma Dp1, iso50

Again just look at the contrast in this black and white image, the dynamic range is just amazing, the shadows have just the right detail for a good image, yet the bright areas are not over exposed. This was a very sunny and thus contrast filled day.

Sigma Dp1 sample 2
Sigma Dp1, iso50

Just look how the colours really pop out of the image, this is as good as landscape slide film was without any photoshop colour post processing. All I did was set what I felt to be the correct exposure in the camera itself. Again and unlike slide film none of the image detail is lost due to the high contrast of this sunny afternoon.

Sigma Dp1 sample 3 black and white
Sigma Dp1, iso50

Sigma Dp1 sample 3
Sigma Dp1, iso50

Again none of the detail is lost in the above two images and a full range of tones and colours has been recorded.

Image print size

One issue is the actual image size out of the camera, this only being some 5 mega-pixels, but as with many peoples comments on mega-pixel size, more does not equal good quality big prints if the sensor is not recording enough detail, this sensors pixels are recording both sharp images (with as much details that the lens holds) and full direct colour detail. I feel very confident that these images could be printed at least A3 in size and beyond, all you need to print landscape books or books that record a holiday or family event for example.

All in all not a bad find for €50, one I don’t think I will be finding every weekend 🙂


Samuel Coulthurst

Samual Coulthurst

Samuel Coulthurst: Victorian Salford, Manchester(UK) – (1889 – 1890)

19th Century street photography

Back in 2002 I was back home in Manchester and visited the Lowry art museum and gallery at the Salford Quays, Manchester. This exhibition has stayed in my memory ever since so I thought I would share a post about the display of work I attended that day.

During a two year period (1889 and 1990), Samuel Coulthurst and his brother-in-law James Higson both members of the Lancashire and Cheshire photography union, dressed as what was known then as rag and bone men.

They carried their camera on the back of a cart they used and took many photographs of the people they met and got to know. Many of these photographs have been archived along with details of who these people were and what they did.

They were not simply doing a street walk about with a camera but spent time both living the lives and getting to know the people of Salford.

Many for the street children that the two photographed would have attended the Charter Street Ragged School, they had either lost parents to industrial accidents or to famine or disease. In the grounds of this church owned school is a grave yard that contains 6000 such parents. The city of Manchester has many such locations from this period.

It was in such conditions that these two photographers lived and worked taking pictures that made history. Without them most people would have forgotten in part at least, the kind of live’s that the 19th century people of Manchester lived including my Own Ancestors.

The exhibition is repeated by the Lowry Gallery so if you are in Manchester and into history/photography then maybe you could call in.

Gallery:

Samual Coulthurst 1

Flat Iron Market Salford. Manchester 1890.

Samual Coulthurst 2

Swan Street, Salford Manchester 1890.

Samual Coulthurst 3

Organ Grinder – Swan Street Salford, Manchester 1890.

Samual Coulthurst 4

Tom Shudehill, Poultry Market. Manchester 1890.


Dorothea Lange

As its a wet and slow afternoon I thought I would just do a quick post to pass on some study links for Dorothea Lange:

Dorothea Lange (May 26, 1895 – October 11, 1965) was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange’s photographs humanized the consequences of the Great Depression and influenced the development of documentary photography.

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A biography worthy of its subject (Linda Gordon’s DOROTHEA LANGE)
@ The historian’s lens

One of the best people and documentary photographers of all time

No she didn’t go digital!

A great book on her work was published by Phaidon and written by Mark Durden (ISBN 0-7148-4619-8)