Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

Posts tagged “Classic Photography

Classic lens review : Tamron Adaptall-2 135mm f2.5

Tamron Adaptall-2 135mm F/2.5 Model 03B:
Lens Review, Nigel Borrington

Classic lens review : Tamron Adaptall-2 135mm f2.5

I have a few classic Nikon and Tamron lenses in my kit of photography equipment as I find that there is something truly enjoyable about using an older manual focus lens.

One of the lenses I love using the most is my Tamron Adaptall-2 135mm f2.5 lens, it dates from the late 1980’s through to the mid 1990’s, as it was in production during this period. On both an FX and DX camera this lens offers a great field of view in your images. It is also a very fast lens at f2.5 however as with many fast lenses when wind open they are not at their sharpest, yet by using a still very fast F2.8 this lens produces very acceptable images.

Sharpness

These images are an attempt to show the sharpness that can be obtained, these images are taken outside and handheld …..

F2.5 to F8

F2.5

F5.6

These images are just a very quick sample of this lens at different apertures, outside in the real world and without the use of a tripod. I feel that this is a very good way of showing just how usable this lens is in a real world environment and on a day to day basis.

Depth of field

One of the great features of a lens with this focus length (135mm) with a fast aperture is that you can isolate subjects that are at some distance from the camera, this is a powerful tool when used in your images and can help to create some interesting effects.

Here I post some very basic examples of using a different depth of field for the same subject.

F2.5

F8

F2.5

F5.6

F8

F2.5

Build Quality and Verdict

I feel that another great feature of this lens is its build quality, the copy I have is many years old yet still feels like new, its a great lens to use and a pleasure to work with. The focus and aperture rings are both wonderful to operate. Manual focus lenses from this era are built to last, constructed using all metal and built to operate with precision and smoothness. The colour and contrast produced are also among the best I have seen, even when put against my modern Nikon lenses.

All in all this is a lovely lens to use. Its very important to me that I like the equipment I use and this great little lens is right up there with my most loved in this respect.

If you can find one I would highly recommend this lens to anyone!, however as for my copy its not for sale! as I look forward to using it for many more years to come 🙂

Lens Gallery


Irish Photographer Francis Browne and his lucky escape from the RMS Titanic …..

Francis Browne's pictures of the Titanic April 14th 1912

Francis Browne’s pictures of the Titanic
April 14th 1912

Francis Browne’s Finest Pictures

In 1985 an Edward O’Donnell was searching in the basement at the Irishjesuit Provincial’s House when he came across a large black metal trunk, in it he found a large colletion of negative albums, photographs and most amazingly of all an album containing photographs of Titanic’s voyage.

All these photographs were the work of Francis Browne who died in 1960 and was almost forgotten by this time. Subsequent investigations revealed he had enjoyed worldwide fame in 1912 when his photographs of the Titanic’s journey to Cobh were published worldwide. He had travelled first class to Cobh having been given a ticket by his uncle Robert Browne, Bishop of Cloyne. His remarkable pictures proved to be unique.

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So it was that Frank was presented with a first class ticket for the Maiden Voyage of the Titanic to bring him as far as Cobh. The morning of the 12th.April 1912 he arrived at Waterloo Station in London to catch the Titanic Special. He immediately started taking photographs, first recording the train journey and then life aboard the Titanic on the initial section of the voyage. Having made friends with a wealthy American family he was offered a ticket for the remaining part of the journey and no doubt excitedly telegraphed a request for permission to go on to New York, to which he received the terse response “Get Off That Ship——Provincial!” That telegram not only saved Frank’s life but also meant that this unique record of the voyage was saved for posterity and guaranteed overnight fame for Frank Browne.

Browne later described the event as “the only time holy obedience saved a man’s life.”

“Get Off That Ship——Provincial!” – I guess many have wondered about this instruction ? , its almost prophetic in its nature – I guess we will never know how or why it was such a strong and clear order . I think it relates to the fact that while many embraced the new-world of 1912 technology, many also stood in fear of it and in this case clearly for good reason.

Frank Browne , April 1912 – Titanic Gallery

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When Dorothea Lange Visited Ireland in 1954

Dorothea Lange A Chat at the O’Halloran Farm [Ireland]

Dorothea Lange A Chat at the O’Halloran Farm [Ireland]

For myself, Dorothea Lange is right at the top of my list of most loved Portrait photographers, I find her images just amazing even after all the years that have passed since she took them.

It is amazing the range of her photography work and telling just how brave and out there she was to capture the vast majority of her subjects. During the great depression in the USA she captured the massive Migrant of farmers from east to west (Dorothea Lange : Migrant Farm Families ).

I have studied much of her great depression images and I am in love and have total admiration with them as a body of work, a hugely important historic study !!!!

One body of Dorothea’s work that I have until recently not looked at, is here images of 1950’s Ireland, I have shared a couple here, living in Ireland for this last ten years or so I have visited and photographed many of the locations she visited – so its wonderful to see these images and amazing to compare just how much life and these places has changed.

I am only starting to collect some books and look at the images from her 1954 Irish visit, however as you cam see the b
lack and white film images she took at just amazing !!!!

Dorothea Lange Michael Kenneally on His 30 Acres [Ireland]

Dorothea Lange Michael Kenneally on His 30 Acres [Ireland]