Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

Posts tagged “irish photograhy

The Hill, a poem by : Jode Cox

A view of the hills county carlow
Mount Leinster
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

The Hill

by : Jode Cox

The road keeps getting longer
the farther that I walk
A head wind seems to push me back
I don’t have the breath to talk

My lungs they burn, my heart it pounds
My throat is getting dry
I see a looming hill ahead
And now I want to cry

To you this hill may seem small
To me it is a mountain
I don’t want to ask you for help
I keep going as fast as I can

I slow with every footstep
Until I have to stop
I find a way to busy my self
To pretend there is nothing wrong

A view of the hills irish landscape.

To admit this trouble to you
Is to admit it to myself
I don’t want to ask of others
I want to do this myself

I feel this is all my fault
If only I could heal
The shame I feel at every gasp
This journey has become too real

If only I was stronger
This disease I could have fought
It silently crept up to me
The illness I don’t want

Each day I am able to do less
No matter how hard I try
For now I can only do my best
You don’t even understand why

A view of the hills..

I used to run and jump and play
Nothing too hard to do
Now the smallest task I take
I must ask for help from you

You think I don’t see the resentment
The bitterness in your face
You think I chose to be sick
To give up on my life in this place

This hill is not enormous
The one you gave to me
I will make it to the top
I will do it just for me


Skellig Michael : Inside the walls

Skellig Michael 30
Skellig Michael, county Kerry, Ireland
Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Skellig Michael : Inside the walls

Skellig Michael is an Island some 12 to 16 kilometres by boat from the ring of kerry, county Kerry, Ireland. It is most famous for the fact that during the 6th to the 8th Century’s a religious settlement was established here.

The Island is a world heritage site and falls under the guardianship of UNESCO, you can find the official historic details from the link on the world heritage web page here : Skellig Michael

In my last two posts I shared the boat trip to the Island and then the long but wonderful walk up to the settlement at the very top of the Island some 218 meters from sea level. Today I just want to share images of the inside area , the location that the people who lived here spent their life’s and also the location in which they are buried and there final resting place.

The images in the Gallery below are placed in the order that you view the buildings when you walk through the site, the only access is through a small passage in the outer walls.

Skellig Michael 33

Skellig Michael 37

The very first thing that greets you are two small head stones, in a very small patch of grass. These are the graves of two young boys, it was a tradition that monks in this period would take very young boys as members to their orders. These boys where from families on the main land and once they moved here they would most likely never return to see there families. Our guide informed us that it is a possibility that both boys were killed by Viking invaders as when the remains where examined wounds were found that indicate that they were killed by the use of weapons, both boy did not pass the ages of ten or twelve. It is also thought that other graves in the pictures here, in the centre of the living area contain some adult victims of such attacks.

Skellig Michael 35

A monastery may have been founded as early as the sixth century, reputedly by Saint Fionán but in 1044 rededicated to Saint Michael, the image here shows a large sculpture that is located towards the middle of the complex. It was described by our guide as being a cross but it could also be very much in the form of a human figure, with the arms to the side and a head looking over the site.

The word Skellig is defined as meaning “splinter of a stone”, and thus this rocky island was dedicated to saint Michael, there are also other Islands around Europe and maybe further away that are dedicated to this saint ( Mont Saint-Michel France, St Michael’s Mount Cornwall)

Skellig Michael 24

One of the most famous features of Skellig Michael are the so called Beehive structures, there were may be six or seven of these of which six are still standing, they were the living space for each of the monks, this fact would indicate that a maximum of seven people lived here in the beehives at any one time, there is a structure at the very end of the settlement that is constructed completely differently, It is thought that the head of the order would have lived in this building but few fact to prove this exist.

In any case the indications are that eight people lived on Skellig Michael at anyone time during its long history.

Living with in these stone constructions looks very harsh , during the time they were occupied however they would have looked very different, in some of the pictures you can see supporting stones that stick out of the main buildings by some amount, it is thought that these stones supported a covering of thatch consisting of straw and clay, this would have been deep and was used to keep the inner stone structure warn and dry. Not all but some of the Beehives have a hole in the roof that was used to let out smoke from fires inside.

At some point I want to post about the life’s of these people, who they were and why they chose to live here, I need to read a little more however , so for the moment that’s it. Three post over the last three day that I hope share a visit to this wonderful and mystical island. If you get a chance I would really in-courage you to visit. Its an experience of a lifetime and helps to open your mind to European history.

I cannot help however feeling that this place holds something else other than the official history, The question as to why these monks felt the need to occupy Skellig Michael, so far of the Irish coast line, is very big !

This place feels like an escape, a refuge but from what and why ?

With such massive risk’s taken by a small group of people to construct three stone walk-ways to the top of the Island and then build the settlement, the question of why looms very large. These were times that the word of Christianity was first being spread across Ireland so why the need to hide away here ?

I need Much more reading, before I understand these bigger questions 🙂

Gallery

Skellig Michael 23

Skellig Michael 31

Skellig Michael 33

Skellig Michael 34

Skellig Michael 35

Skellig Michael 43

Skellig Michael 38

Skellig Michael 40

Skellig Michael 39

Skellig Michael 42

Skellig Michael 37

Skellig Michael 36

Skellig Michael 41


Stradbally cove and caves, County Waterford

Stradbally Cave 4
Stradbally Cove and caves, County Waterford
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

The cove at Stradbally, County Waterford is on of my favourite places to visit along the coast line of souther Ireland, it a deep cove that contains some wonderful little caves that have a long history, Most likely used for smuggling goods in the past.

These days they more used to take shelter from bad weather or just sit in and enjoy for views of the blue sea here , they are a great feature well worth a visit.

Stradbally Cove and cave: Gallery

Stradbally Cave 1

Stradbally Cave 2

Stradbally Cave 3

Stradbally Cave 5


Finding light , around the farm.

The Light from the Door 11
Burnchurch Farm , County Tipperary
landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Light is just an amazing subject in photography, the searching for and finding of interesting lighting conditions can become an obsession for many visual artists.

I have found over the years that the best light can be found in places that need to be search for, looking for limited amounts of light is I feel my personal interest when getting an image I feel happy with.

Burnchurch is an old Family Farm in county Tipperary, the land here is still farmed but the house is no longer occupied, we visit and stay here a few times during the year, its a wonderful location to get away and relax for a week.

Some of the images taken here are an example of my attempt to explore and experiment with the use of limited light in photography.

The Images in the below Gallery are all taken inside some of the sheds around the farm yard and even on a wet day the light through the windows and doors here is just perfect. I love the way the light falls through the windows and into the rooms, falling onto objects that have been hanging here for many years.

I feel that photography and the images it captures is a great way to explore subjects like light, capturing in an instance the light in a room or how it is falling over a landscape.

Finding light on the Farm , Gallery

The Light from the Door 1

The Light from the Door 2

The Light from the Door 3

The Light from the Door 4

The Light from the Door 5

The Light from the Door 7

The Light from the Door 8

The Light from the Door 9

The Light from the Door 10


The Unnamed Lake, Poem by : Frederick George Scott (1861-1944)

The Unnamed Lake 3
The Unnamed Lake,Comeragh Mountains,Co.Waterford
Irish Landscape Photography

The Unnamed Lake

By : Frederick George Scott (1861-1944)

IT sleeps among the thousand hills
Where no man ever trod,
And only nature’s music fills
The silences of God.

Great mountains tower above its shore,
Green rushes fringe its brim,
And o’er its breast for evermore
The wanton breezes skim.

Dark clouds that intercept the sun
Go there in Spring to weep,
And there, when Autumn days are done,
White mists lie down to sleep.

Sunrise and sunset crown with gold
The peaks of ageless stone,
Where winds have thundered from of old
And storms have set their throne.

The Unnamed Lake 2.

No echoes of the world afar
Disturb it night or day,
The sun and shadow, moon and star
Pass and repass for aye.

‘Twas in the grey of early dawn,
When first the lake we spied,
And fragments of a cloud were drawn
Half down the mountain side.

Along the shore a heron flew,
And from a speck on high,
That hovered in the deepening blue,
We heard the fish-hawk’s cry.

Among the cloud-capt solitudes,
No sound the silence broke,
Save when, in whispers down the woods,
The guardian mountains spoke.

The Unnamed Lake 1.

Through tangled brush and dewy brake,
Returning whence we came,
We passed in silence, and the lake
We left without a name.


Down in the deep water, Image and Poem

Down in deep water
Castlecomer lakes and river Dinin, county KIlkenny
Infra-red image
Irish Landscape photography : Nigel Borrington

Down in the deep water..

Down in the deep water
By the edge of the river
Where I ponder my life
Just how did I get to this

Down in the deep water
By the edge of the river
Where the waterfall of dreams
Sweeps away what’s left to the abyss

Down in the deep water
By the edge of the river
Where time stands still
just only forever.

Down in the deep water
By the edge of the river
Where I buried all
That was ever my childhood

Where I let it go,
Where it bends and meanders,
Twisting along as the years went past.
Seemingly calm, but screaming beneath the surface
Were its hidden whirlpools, a sweeping current

Down in the deep water,
I left the edge of the river,
As I looked down
For my soul at the bottom.

Deep in the deep water
Swept away by the river

I drowned in life,

Sinking forever.


A January Morn, a Poem by Nelda Hartmann

New years day 2014 Landscape 1
Kilkenny landscape photography
New years day 2014
Irish Landscape

A January Poem

January Morn
By – Nelda Hartmann

Bare branches of each tree
on this chilly January morn
look so cold so forlorn.
Gray skies dip ever so low
left from yesterday’s storm.

Yet in the heart of each tree
waiting for each who wait to see
new life as warm sun and breeze will blow,
like magic, unlock springs sap to flow,
buds, new leaves, then blooms will grow.”


Just Grazing

Just Grazing
Just Grazing, Taken in the Burren, County Clare
Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Just taking your time walking along the country lanes around County Clare, up near the Burren is a wonderful thing to do, I took this image last year on a visit.

Cattle Just Grazing


Cahergall ring fort, County Kerry

Kerry Ring forts 3
All Images : Canon G1x
Irish ring forts, Co.Kerry
Irish Landscape photography : Nigel Borrington

Cahergall Ring fort

Cahergall stone fort

Following on from yesterdays post relating to Leacanabuile ring for in county Kerry, the area around the fort also contains more ring forts from the same period in Irish history.

Cahergall ring fort is a massive stone construction, built between 400BC and 500AD, It can be found close to Cahersiveen, County Kerry. Leacanabuaile feels very much more like a dwelling place for people to both live and keep themselves safe from the surrounding Environment. This included raiders and wild animals stealing cattle.

On approaching Cahergall, the scale of this fort is massive in comparison to Leacanabuaile, the walls rise some four to six meters from the ground, perfectly flat and sloping inwards from the ground towards the top. The fort is some twenty five meters wide and the walls some four meter thick.

Inside the fort the inner walls are stepped and consisting of three levels, each of these levels has a series of steps that take you the upper level. The top of the wall is full grassed and walkable. The views of the coastline and landscape around the fort is spectacular from here.

Although this fort is described as a living place, it is very different from other forts around, It has only one internal enclosure and this structure does not look like it could be lived in, at least not in the same way as the buildings within the other forts.

The semi-circular wall’s forming a circle in the center of the fort appear to be very much the focus point from the main walls, almost like this place was a ceremonial theater of some kind. You have to ask why the very different design for this place compared to the other forts and why it was built on such a grand scale. It is very much the focus point for the local community in the same way a church or public building would be today.

As to who these people where, Pat Flannery has some very interesting ideas and his views on Irish per-christian history is very interesting :

http://www.patflannery.com/IrishHistory/TheMilesians.htm

Cahergall Fort has been restored by the OPW and is owned by the Irish State.

Cahergall is well worth a visit if you are in the area and only short distance from Leacanabuaile Stone Fort.

Image Gallery

Kerry Ring forts 2

Kerry Ring forts 4

Kerry Ring forts10

Kerry Ring forts11

Kerry Ring forts12

Kerry Ring forts 1


Flowers on the river bank

Yesterday’s weather here in Kilkenny was just wonderful and all the flowers along the river Nore are coming to life, It was just brilliant to be able to capture the two images below.

Kilkenny photography spring flowers from the river bank
Nikon D200, 50mm f1.8 lens, iso 200
Flowers on the banks of the river Nore kilkenny
Nigel Borrington

Kilkenny photography spring flowers
Nikon D200, 50mm f1.8 lens, iso 200
Flowers on the banks of the river Nore kilkenny
Nigel Borrington