Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

Posts tagged “Argyll

European passage tombs ( Knockroe, county Kilkenny and Kilmartin, Argyll, Scotland )

Knockroe passage tomb

Knockroe, county Kilkenny

Knockroe http://www.megalithicireland.com/Knockroe%20Passage%20Tomb.html

kilmartin 0366

Kilmartin, Argyll, Scotland

Kilmartin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilmartin_Glen

A link through time

These two mystical European locations stand two hundred and fifteen miles apart, Knockroe is in county Kilkenny republic of Ireland and the other, Kilmartin is in Argyll, Scotland, about 15 miles south of Oban.

Knockroe panel

kilmartin 0361

The reason I displaying these images in the same post is simply to highlight something that only occurred to me when one year I happened to visit them only weeks apart. The fact is you could view these two sites individually and study them by themselves all you like, however you would be missing something very important!

Knockroe Markings

The people’s who created these sites shared the same time period and clearly the same beliefs and culture. They lived in Europe both in Ireland and Scotland located in the Geographical British Isles; however some 5500 years ago they knew nothing of recent nations and nationalism , of national borders or even the concept of a European nation.

Knockroe scetch

Both monuments are passage tombs, placed for their dead to be remembered, they both also contain elements for marking the passing of the year and its seasons, by measuring the movement of the sun and the moon.

The structures in these places along with the cultural function they served is identical, to me this shows that these people traveled the seas and not only shared goods and beliefs they in fact where the same peoples. They did not just get on with each other through trade they were each other as brother and sister, mother and father, family and friends.

When they knew nothing of modern boundaries and divisions, what else could they be?

These same people who traveled from one place to another in order to expand their options and abilities did not in any shape or form see themselves as English or Scottish or Irish they were family to each other and nothing more or less!


Loch Melfort, Argyll

Loch Melfort _0002
Loch Melfort, Oban, Argyll
Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Melfort Village, is located about ten miles south of the fishing port of Oban , Argyll , Scotland, It sits on the banks of an open sea Loch that faces the western Islands of ( Luing, Shuna and Scarbe) all home to golden eagles and red dear.

This is a wonderful location for a holiday as the views from the holiday homes are just wonderful and walking along the coast line and loch side lanes here is just as relaxing and inspiring an experience as you can have. Even in the winter a stay is spectacular , sitting by an open fire in the evenings with the wind blowing in the trees and on the open Waters of the Loch is an experience I will never forget.

The Images below were taken last November on a weeks stay here…..

Gallery

Loch Melfort _0001

Loch Melfort _0005

Loch Melfort _0003

Loch Melfort _0004

Loch Melfort _0006

A Walk along Lock Melfort 8

Loch Melfort _0002

Loch Melfort _0007


Harbour Lighthouse, Crinan, Scotland, (Harbour Lights) Poem by Ernestine Northover.

The harbour lighthouse Crinan
Harbour Lighthouse, Crinan, Argyll, Scotland
Landscape photography: Nigel Borrington

Harbour Lights

By: Ernestine Northover

The harbour lights are beckoning,
Our stout boat is riding high,
By the distant view, we’re reckoning,
We are nearly home and dry.

We’ve travelled many an ocean,
And weathered storms so wild,
Of the seas, we have a notion,
By it all, we’ve been beguiled.

There’ve been times when we have wavered,
And times when concern was rife,
Many moments we have savoured,
And pondered upon this life.

But seafaring days are our days,
And when all is said and done,
These seas attract, in such special ways,
And conquering them can be fun.

But, like now, we’re to base returning,
Friends and family to meet and greet,
There’s a rest from the sea’s endless churning,
Somewhere solid to plant our feet.

Now the harbour lights are gleaming,
And the sails relax their strain,
Our faces begin their beaming,
For we’re safely back home again.

© Ernestine Northover


Vital Spark and Artic Penguin, Inveraray.

Vital Spark 1
Nikon D7000, 18-200mm vr2 lens
Vital Spark and Artic Penguin, Inveraray.
Landscape photography by : Nigel Borrington

Vital Spark and Artic Penguin, Inveraray.

There is some 20 years gap between the two photographs in this post both taken at Inveraray , Argyll and Bute, Scotland.

The image below was taken in 1993 and features the Artic Penguin sitting by herself, the above image was taken on Thursday as I was passing. As you can see two boats are now harboured along the pier.

Artic Pengiun Inveraray

The second boat in the image is the Vital Spark, the detail of which are below :

The Vital Spark

Vital Spark is a fictional Clyde puffer, created by Scottish writer Neil Munro. As its captain, the redoubtable Para Handy, often says: “the smertest boat in the coastin’ tred”.

Puffers seem to have been regarded fondly even before Munro began publishing his short stories in the Glasgow Evening News in 1905. This may not be surprising, for these small steamboats were then providing a vital supply link around the west coast and Hebrides islands of Scotland. The charming rascality of the stories went well beyond the reality of a commercial shipping business, but they brought widespread fame. They appeared in the newspaper over 20 years, were collected in book form by 1931, inspired the 1953 film The Maggie, and came out as three popular television series, dating from 1959 to 1995.

The original BBC Series Para Handy – Master Mariner, which ran from 1959–60, starred Duncan MacRae (Para Handy), Roddy McMillan (The Mate), and John Grieve (Dan MacPhail, the engineer). Six episodes were filmed, none of which survive.

In 1963 Macrae, McMillan and Grieve, accompanied by Alex Mackenzie and guitarist George Hill, recorded an album of songs, Highland Voyage. A short film was made to accompany the recording, filmed on board a puffer as it cruised around the Firth of Clyde. Macrae and McMillan appear as The Captain and The Mate, while Mackenzie appears as The Engineer, causing Grieve to move to play The Cook. Although very obviously based on Munro’s characters, the names of Para Handy, the Vital Spark, etc. are never mentioned, probably due to copyright issues.

In the second version, The Vital Spark, McMillan took the role of Para Handy, and Grieve reprised his role as McPhail; Walter Carr (Dougie the Mate) and Alex McAvoy (Sunny Jim) completed the crew, and the series ran for three series between 1965 and 1974. The third series, filmed several years after the first two, was in colour and consisted of remakes of selected earlier episodes.

In 1994 BBC Scotland produced The Tales of Para Handy which starred Gregor Fisher in the lead role alongside Sean Scanlan as Dougie, Andrew Fairlie as Sunny Jim and Rikki Fulton as Dan McPhail. The series also featured a young David Tennant in one of his first acting roles. Alex McAvoy, who played Sunny Jim in The Vital Spark, appears in one episode as a fellow captain of Para Handy in the coastal trade.
The deck of a “puffer”.

“In her captain’s own (islands accented) words, the Vital Spark is “aal hold, with the boiler behind, four men and a derrick, and a watter-butt and a pan loaf in the foc’sle”. The way these steam lighters with their steam-powered derricks could offload at any suitable beach or small pier is featured in many Vital Spark stories, and allows amusing escapades in the small west coast communities. The cargoes carried in the hold vary from gravel or coal to furniture to livestock, the crew’s quarters in the forecastle are taken as lodgings by holidaymakers or lost children and the steam engine struggles on under the dour care of the engineer McPhail. Tales are recounted of improbably dramatic missions in World War I. Others scoff at her as a coal gaabbert, reflecting the origins of the puffers, but an indignant Para Handy is always ready to defend his boat, proudly comparing her 6 knots (11 km/h) speed and her looks with the glamorous Clyde steamers.
Eilean Eisdeal dressed as the Vital Spark.

The stories sparked considerable interest in the puffers, and many books explore their now vanished world. When VIC 72, renamed Eilean Eisdeal, ventured from her home at the Inveraray Maritime Museum to visit the Glasgow River Festival in 2005, she proudly bore the name Vital Spark in testimony to her continuing popularity. Now in 2006 she proudly is the Vital Spark of Glasgow having been successfully re-registered.

The Argyll brewer Fyne Ales, situated close to Inveraray, where the current boat rests and Neil Munro was born, produces a beer called Vital Spark [1] in tribute to the series.

In December 2007, the Vital Spark Clyde puffer returned to the Forth and Clyde Canal – the place of her ‘birth’, as reported on STV news'[2] Reporting Scotland.

The puffer now sits on the slip way at Crinan boatyard awaiting restoration. ”


5 solo images for the week (Friday).

Artic penguin 3
Nikon F90x
Ilford XP2
Nikon 50mm f1.4 lens
Inveraray, Argyll and Bute, Scotland,
On the western shore of Loch Fyne.
Landscape photography : Nigel borrington

Inveraray, Argyll and Bute, Scotland

Inveraray sits on the A83 between Glasgow and Oban/Argyll, I have driven this route many times and stopping to look at the boat, Artic Penguin and loch Fyne was something I do every time, just a fantastic view.

The morning I took this image was cold and very still, the pier was empty and it was a few moments of magic in the air, of peace and silence.


Five go up a hill and come down a mountain

Five go up a hill

Some time back Five of us (Breda, Tess, Andrew his brother Steve along with Myself) all headed from north London to Melfort Village, Argyll, Scotland for the week. At the time I owned a time share week here and the visit to such a wonderful location each March was more than welcome.

One Morning with myself and Steve both being into photography, the others just wanting a good walk we packed the bags and headed up the hills at the back of the Melford estate, the below images I hope do something to document this walk and the resulting Photographs.

I only found these pictures again last week as I am scanning all my old negatives….

5 Go up a hill

Melfort Village argyll

All images taken on a Nikon F90x and on Kodak 200iso colour film as you can see…


Kate Rusby

The Lark ( Kate Rusby )

Kate Rusby The Lark
Nikon F90x film camera
Kodak 200iso colour film
A view over Melfort Village, Argyll, Scotland
Nigel Borrington

Out in the field where the lark it flies,
Over the earth where my heart it lies,
Oh how it sings when the west wind blows,
Out in the field where no-one goes.

Oh how I’m cold will you let me in,
If you could hear me speak, where I would begin,
Time it is past now and I roam free,
Is it wrong to wish you still need me,
is it wrong to wish you still need me.

Out in the field where the lark it sings,
There I was waiting for all love brings,
There I stood and there I fell,
Out in the field that I know well.

Oh how I’m cold will you let me in,
If you could hear me speak, where I would begin,
Time it is past now and I roam free,
Is it wrong to wish you still need me,
is it wrong to wish you still need me.

Out in the field where the lark resides,
Here I’ll remain where my heart can hide,
Only the lark and the west wind know,
I’m in this field where no-one goes.

Oh how I’m cold will you let me in,
If you could hear me speak, where I would begin,
Time it is past now and I roam free,
Is it wrong to wish you still need me,
is it wrong to wish you still need me

You Tube, Live performance : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imLg8DVAuHU