Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

Posts tagged “golden retrievers

County Waterford , Ireland – An October’s walk along the Coast.

An October walk along the Waterford coast Irish Landscape Photography  Nigel Borrington

An October walk along the Waterford coast
Irish Landscape Photography
Nigel Borrington

Molly is our 12 and 1/2 year old Golden retriever and she loves nothing more than being in and around water – as often as she can !!! Rivers, Lakes, and the Sea. I often think that if it was not for her I would not have visited as many wonderful places here in Ireland, just trying to keep her walked and fit!!!, but being over 12 years old now, she has slowed down a little but still loves her swimming and coastal visits.

I also love visiting the Irish coastline, our nearest locations are along the county Waterford coast, with its rocky small coves and caves its just a perfect and dramatic coastline in many ways.

October is a great month for these visits as the mornings bring rolling in sea mists and dramatic waves as the temperatures slide slowly into the winter months …..

A walk along the Waterford coast line : Gallery

An october walk along the waterford coast line 7

An October walk along the Waterford coast Irish Landscape Photography  Nigel Borrington

An october walk along the waterford coast line 6

An october walk along the waterford coast line 3

An october walk along the waterford coast line 5

An october walk along the waterford coast line 2

An october walk along the waterford coast line 1


Four feet Friday !!! , “Four Feet”, by Rudyard Kipling

Four Feet Friday Molly our Golden  retriever

Four Feet Friday
Molly our Golden retriever

This is Molly our somewhat aging but much loved Golden Retriever, Aging very well I am happy to say 🙂

I took these images while on a walk with her yesterday in some local woodlands and was reminded of this Kipling Poem.

I think he captured so well the love and loyalty that pets bring to our lives and in the last, the memories that they leave when they are no longer able to be with us on their daily walks, of which I don’t think Molly has every mist a day. Mainly because I only need to go near the back door and there she is looking up and sitting down ready !!

I have enjoyed every walk with her four paws – in front and sometimes behind 🙂

Four Feet

by Rudyard Kipling

I have done mostly what most men do,
And pushed it out of my mind;
But I can’t forget, if I wanted to,
Four-Feet trotting behind.

Day after day, the whole day through —
Wherever my road inclined —
Four-Feet said, “I am coming with you!”
And trotted along behind.

Molly Four feet Friday 2.

Now I must go by some other round, —
Which I shall never find —
Somewhere that does not carry the sound
Of Four-Feet trotting behind.

by Rudyard Kipling


Molly, the mountain girl….

Mountain girl
Nikon d700
Molly on Slievenamon, County Tipperary
Irish landscape photography

Molly is our 10 year old golden retriever she has been on many walks on the Irish mountains, I just love her along-side me while walking and look at the views.

She will often, take a rest to look at the views just in the same way I will, here she is talking a seat at the foot of Slievenamon, county Tipperary, after the long walk to top.


Sunrise in the Park

Sunrise Fair Green Callan 1
Sunrise ay Callan’s Fair green
Kilkenny Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

This morning’s sunrise was just as wonderful as the sunset yesterday, I took Molly our ten year old Golden Retriever out for a walk on the local green, the sight of the rising sun through the trees was a great start to the day.

Sunrise Fair Green Callan 5

Sunrise Fair Green Callan 2

Sunrise Fair Green Callan 3

Sunrise Fair Green Callan 4


Our dog Molly, well she should have been an Otter!

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 1
All images using a Nikon D7000, 18-200mm lens, iso 200

Our dog Molly she should of been an Otter

Since she was a one year old our Golden retriever Molly just loved a swim in our local rivers, she is now ten and has had a good swim most days. She was diagnosed last year with arthritis and along with the medical products we get her a swim once a day is just about the best thing to keep her moving healthy and fit!

Molly’s Gallery

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 7

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 2

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 4

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 5

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 6

Our dog Molly should have been an otter 1

Arthritis in dogs

Spotting Arthritis in Dogs

Arthritis doesn’t discriminate. It affects not only people of all ages — including children — but also strikes our furry friends, too. If you’re a dog-owner, you make sure your buddy takes his heartworm medicine, eats well, looks bright-eyed and playful, and greets you as only a doggy can when you come home. You notice changes in mood and activity, so if your pet isn’t feeling his best you may suspect a cold or stomach virus – but it could be arthritis. In fact, arthritis affects one in every five adult dogs in the U.S. and is one of the most common sources of chronic pain that veterinarians treat.

Spot’s Pals Are Early Diagnosis and Treatment

How do you know if it’s arthritis? Your dog can’t explain what’s wrong with him, so it’s important to watch his non-verbal cues closely and take even subtle changes seriously.

Signs that your dog may have arthritis:

Favoring a limb
Difficulty sitting or standing
Sleeping more
Seeming to have stiff or sore joints
Hesitancy to jump, run or climb stairs
Weight gain
Decreased activity or less interest in play
Attitude or behavior changes
Being less alert

If your dog seems to have any of these symptoms for more than two weeks take him to your veterinarian for an arthritis evaluation, which will involve a physical exam and possibly X-rays. The best thing to do for your dog in managing his arthritis is to get a diagnosis and start a treatment plan as soon as possible. Treating canine arthritis is similar to that of human osteoarthritis.

Therapies may include:

Healthy diet and exercise to help maintain proper weight.
Working with your veterinarian to find a drug treatment that helps relieve the pain.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS): the most common form of pharmaceutical treatment for arthritis in dogs.
Over-the-counter pet treatments, such as pills or food containing either glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate or Omega fatty acids. Both have shown to help relieve the symptoms of arthritis in dogs.
A veterinarian-prescribed NSAID and an over-the-counter treatment that together may help decrease pain and disease progression.

Never give your dog human medication without checking first with your veterinarian. Certain medications can be toxic to dogs – particularly acetaminophen and ibuprofen – and a safe dose will differ between a greyhound and a dachshund.

No matter how you decide to treat your dog’s arthritis, make sure you work with a veterinarian to ensure that you select a program that helps your best buddy.


A morning walk for Molly

A morning walk for molly 2

I love this time of year, we get up early and go for a walk in the woods….

Irish Landscape photography 6

The paths have turned so green and full of life…..

Irish nature photography 2

The Hawthorn flowers are all out and looking their best…

A morning walk for molly 1

Its so warm already, I have to go slower than in the winter. This gives me time however to look at so much….

Irish Landscape photography 5

The clover

Irish nature photography 1

All the new leafs

Irish nature photography 3

Even the seed heads…

A morning walk for molly 3

Finally a slow walk up the hill…

Irish Landscape photography 3

I was 10 last weekend, so I really enjoy a sit down and a long look at the view.

Thank you for sharing my morning with me.


Molly, well she should have been an Otter…

Molly the otter

Molly Our Golden retriever just loves to swim, since she was about one year old she is just mad for the water.

If we go for a walk with her and it has not included a dip then she will sit in the boot of the car looking at us as if to say “What about the swim then?”.

I have often wondered just why this is such a strong part of her nature:

Molly the otter swimming out

Well I found this article on the Pedigree website and it helps in understanding why Golden’s love water, and offers advice if you have a Golden retriever…

Golden Retrievers: Born to Swim

We’ve all seen the Golden Retriever at the beach who chases the tennis ball into the surf for hours. We wonder how he is able to get past the breakers, swim with his head above the chop, and manage the strong currents, focused only on getting that ball and dropping it at the feet of his owner.

The answer is in his DNA. Goldens were bred in Scotland in the mid-19th Century to retrieve waterfowl and game birds. The now-extinct Tweed Water Spaniel was crossed with Irish Setters, Newfoundland dogs, Bloodhounds, and other water retrievers to create the breed we know today. The result is a strong, highly trainable dog with a water-repellent coat that can easily withstand cold water.

Taking the plunge with your favorite Golden

You’ve probably noticed your retriever’s excitement as he gets near water. His instinctive love of water is so strong, trying to hold him back rarely works-so why not join him? Just keep these water safety tips in mind:

If you’re swimming with your Golden near the ocean, remember that he’s probably ingesting some salt water. Carry an ample supply of fresh water for him to drink so he doesn’t become dehydrated during play.
If your Golden is playing with children in a pool or lake, remind them not to hang onto his collar or drag him down. While he’s a stronger swimmer than most children, there is a risk of him getting pulled under.
Remember, cold water is not the deterrent to your Golden Retriever that it is to you. He could jump into frigid waters, and if he can’t get out, this could spell trouble. Leashing your Golden near deep water is a good idea.

Take these few precautions and you can expect years of enjoyment watching your Golden do what he does best-swim effortlessly and endlessly through the water!


Pet’s, Just how good are they for you?

Could molly be any happier

Molly our 10 year old Golden retriever

My mother loved Golden retrievers, we owned cats….

She would always say that you should never truly trust someone who’s not into pets, while I don’t hold to this I kinda get what she was talking about.

You don’t have to own a pet to love them in fact you can show you love them by being honest to yourself if your not in a position to look after them correctly. You are then free to love and look after other peoples pets.

But just how good are they for us, well I found this article and it look like they are very very good for us!

http://stress.about.com/od/lowstresslifestyle/a/petsandstress.htm

When thinking of ways to reduce stress in life, usually techniques like meditation, yoga and journaling come to mind. These are great techniques, to be sure. But getting a new best friend can also have many stress relieving and health benefits. While human friends provide great social support and come with some fabulous benefits, this article focuses on the benefits of furry friends: cats and dogs! Research shows that, unless you’re someone who really dislikes animals or is absolutely too busy to care for one properly, pets can provide excellent social support, stress relief and other health benefits—perhaps more than people! Here are more health benefits of pets:

Pets Can Improve Your Mood:

For those who love animals, it’s virtually impossible to stay in a bad mood when a pair of loving puppy eyes meets yours, or when a super-soft cat rubs up against your hand. Research supports the mood-enhancing benefits of pets. A recent study found that men with AIDS were less likely to suffer from depression if they owned a pet. (According to one study, men with AIDS who did not own a pet were about three times more likely to report symptoms of depression than men who did not have AIDS. But men with AIDS who had pets were only about 50 percent more likely to report symptoms of depression, as compared to men in the study who did not have AIDS.)

Pets Control Blood Pressure Better Than Drugs:

Yes, it’s true. While ACE inhibiting drugs can generally reduce blood pressure, they aren’t as effective on controlling spikes in blood pressure due to stress and tension. However, in a recent study, groups of hypertensive New York stockbrokers who got dogs or cats were found to have lower blood pressure and heart rates than those who didn’t get pets. When they heard of the results, most of those in the non-pet group went out and got pets!

Pets Encourage You To Get Out And Exercise:

Whether we walk our dogs because they need it, or are more likely to enjoy a walk when we have companionship, dog owners do spend more time walking than non-pet owners, at least if we live in an urban setting. Because exercise is good for stress management and overall health, owning a dog can be credited with increasing these benefits.

Pets Can Help With Social Support:

When we’re out walking, having a dog with us can make us more approachable and give people a reason to stop and talk, thereby increasing the number of people we meet, giving us an opportunity to increase our network of friends and acquaintances, which also has great stress management benefits.

Pets Stave Off Loneliness and Provide Unconditional Love:

Pets can be there for you in ways that people can’t. They can offer love and companionship, and can also enjoy comfortable silences, keep secrets and are excellent snugglers. And they could be the best antidote to loneliness. In fact, research shows that nursing home residents reported less loneliness when visited by dogs than when they spent time with other people! All these benefits can reduce the amount of stress people experience in response to feelings of social isolation and lack of social support from people.

Pets Can Reduce Stress—Sometimes More Than People:

While we all know the power of talking about your problems with a good friend who’s also a good listener, recent research shows that spending time with a pet may be even better! Recent research shows that, when conducting a task that’s stressful, people actually experienced less stress when their pets were with them than when a supportive friend or even their spouse was present! (This may be partially due to the fact that pets don’t judge us; they just love us.)

It’s important to realize that owning a pet isn’t for everyone. Pets do come with additional work and responsibility, which can bring its own stress. However, for most people, the benefits of having a pet outweigh the drawbacks. Having a furry best friend can reduce stress in your life and bring you support when times get tough.