Capturing the world with Photography, Painting and Drawing

Wild Garlic

Wild Garlic
Nikon D7000

I captured these photographs in Glenbawn Woods, Clonmel, Co Tipperary in April 2012, these woods are on the banks of the river Suir.

Wild Garlic grows very well in many Irish woodlands it needs a dark and wet part of the wood, In this wood part of the walk passed along the banks of the river. This area if covered with Garlic and the smell as you walk through the carpet of it is overpowering an wonderful. I took a large bag with me and collected enough to last me sometime.

Wild Garlic has been used throughout history as a health and healing food and it heals many complaints, this year I will be back again and its out very soon!

Ramsons Wild Garlic

(Allium ursinum)

Description:

Tall hairless perennial plant, with erect unbranched stem; usually found growing in large colonies. The leaves, normally 2, are upto 20cm long and are broad, pointed and long-stalked. The flowers are white star-shaped with 6 segments. It is readily identified by its strong scent of garlic, particularly if bruised or crushed.

The glossy green leaves of Ramsons, or Wild Garlic are delicious in sandwiches, used sparingly in salads, or added to sauces and dressings. It also makes splendid pesto. The bulb can also be eaten raw or cooked, and can be harvested all year round, though is best used when the plant is dormant from July to December or January. It has a fairly strong garlic flavour, though it is quite small and fiddly to harvest.

Flowers – raw or cooked. These are somewhat stronger than the leaves, in small quantities they make a decorative and very tasty addition to salads. The flowering heads can still be eaten as the seed pods are forming, though the flavour gets even stronger as the seeds ripen.

“maye very well be eaten in April and Maie with butter, of such as are of a strong constitution, and labouring men” – Gerard

Size: 50cm

Distribution: Throughout UK

Flowering months: April – June

Habitat: Damp woods, hedges, shady damp meadows, streamsides.

Folk Names: Broad-Leaved Garlic, Wild Garlic, Ramsons, Wood Garlic, Roman Garlic

Active ingredients; essential oils, vitamin C, allicin, iron.

Used to treat digestive problems, rheumatism, high blood pressure and asthma. When applied to the skin, this species is rubefacient. Externally, the bruised leaves may be applied to abscesses and boils. It may help the circulation and also be antiviral. A popular cure for the kidney stone and for purifying and strengthening the blood. Alone or with other ingredients it was also used in poultices and as a diuretic.

Ref : Wild Garlic

6 responses

  1. 1annecasey

    Very pretty – and useful too… pretty pongy though, from memory!!

    April 18, 2013 at 11:56 am

  2. Hello Anne,

    Thank you ๐Ÿ™‚ and yes but well worth collecting though!!

    ๐Ÿ™‚

    April 18, 2013 at 12:09 pm

  3. Very beautiful photographs. Love the information about what is to do health wise. I wonder if garlic bulbs help with similar health issues. We eat bulb garlic almost every meal. A HUGE favorite by all in my house. Thanks for the wonderful post Nigel! Loved it. -amy

    April 18, 2013 at 2:23 pm

    • Thank you Amy, Hum that’s a very good question!!

      I will go do some reading on that one and post back here !

      Thank you! ๐Ÿ™‚

      April 18, 2013 at 2:28 pm

      • I can google it myself, I was just hoping that the health properties were the same…Thank you, Nigel for your blog making me question so much! -amy

        April 18, 2013 at 3:12 pm

      • OK that’s great, I was interested for me too :)!

        Thank you ๐Ÿ™‚

        April 18, 2013 at 3:16 pm

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.