A Photographers blog

Welcome, We hope you enjoy the landscape and nature images in this site, Nigel also runs www.studio63.ie a protrait and Wedding photography business.

Latest

Irish landscape photography and a Poem by : Edwin Arlington Robinson

Kilkenny photograher, Nigel Borrington The old Mill at Goresbridge

Kilkenny photograher, Nigel Borrington
The old Mill on the river Barrow, Goresbridge, Kilkenny

The Mill

By : Edwin Arlington Robinson

The miller’s wife had waited long,
The tea was cold, the fire was dead;
And there might yet be nothing wrong
In how he went and what he said:
“There are no millers any more,”
Was all that she heard him say;
And he had lingered at the door
So long it seemed like yesterday.

Sick with a fear that had no form
She knew that she was there at last;
And in the mill there was a warm
And mealy fragrance of the past.
What else there was would only seem
To say again what he had meant;
And what was hanging from a beam
Would not have heeded where she went.

And if she thought it followed her,
She may have reasoned in the dark
That one way of the few there were
Would hide her and would leave no mark:
Black water, smooth above the weir
Like starry velvet in the night,
Though ruffled once, would soon appear
The same as ever to the sight.

The Autumnal equinox 2014 (Mabon)

autumnal equinox
autumnal equinox 2014 over Slievenamon, County Tipperary
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

What is the autumnal equinox

Our year is divided into four season’s(Winter, Spring, Summer and Autumn), the starting date of these seasons is determined by the movement of the sun as our planet orbits around it with a little help by the tilt of the earth’s axis.

On the autumnal equinox, day and night are equally 12 hours long . As the Sun crosses the celestial equator going southward; it rises exactly due east and sets exactly due west.

From tomorrow we start the slow movement towards the winter season, marked my the shortest day , the 21st of December.

Autumnal equinox in the Pagan world.

The holiday of the autumnal equinox, Harvest Home, Mabon, the Feast of the Ingathering, Meán Fómhair or Alban Elfed (in Neo-Druid traditions), is a Pagan ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth and a recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months.

The name Mabon was coined by Aidan Kelly around 1970 as a reference to Mabon ap Modron, a character from Welsh mythology. Among the sabbats, it is the second of the three Pagan harvest festivals, preceded by Lammas / Lughnasadh and followed by Samhain.

Ref : Wheel of the Year

Eurasian eagle-owl

The Eurasian eagle-owl Photography : Nigel Borrington

The Eurasian eagle-owl
Photography : Nigel Borrington

Kingdom Falconry is based and located at Crag caves, Castle-island, Co. Kerry, 2km from the town. They offer you the unique opportunity to get up close and personal with a variety of very majestic and awe-inspiring birds of prey.

One of these birds is an Eurasian eagle-owl a fantastic bird that was just wonderful to get very close to.

Kingdom Falconry can be contacted from this link.

If you are in county Kerry and near Castle-island and have sometime , I would very much recommend dropping in to meet these birds.

The Eurasian eagle-owl is described as follows :

The Eurasian eagle-owl (Bubo bubo) is a species of eagle-owl resident in much of Eurasia. It is sometimes called the European eagle-owl and is, in Europe, where it is the only member of its genus besides the snowy owl, occasionally abbreviated to just eagle-owl. In India, it is often called the Indian great horned owl, though this may cause confusion with the similarly named American bird.It is one of the largest species of owl, and females can grow to a total length of 75 centimetres (30 in), with a wingspan of 188 centimetres (74 in), males being slightly smaller. This bird has distinctive ear tufts, the upper parts are mottled black and tawny and the wings and tail are barred. The underparts are buff, streaked with darker colour. The facial disc is poorly developed and the orange eyes are distinctive.

The Eurasian eagle-owl is found in a number of habitats but is mostly a bird of mountain regions, coniferous forests, steppes and remote places. It is a mostly nocturnal predator, hunting for a range of different prey species, predominately small mammals but also birds of varying sizes, reptiles, amphibians, fish, large insects and earthworms. It typically breeds on cliff ledges, in gullies, among rocks or in some other concealed location. The nest is a scrape in which up to six eggs are laid at intervals and which hatch at different times. The female incubates the eggs and broods the young, and the male provides food for her and when they hatch, for the nestling’s as well.

Continuing parental care for the young is provided by both adults for about five months.

There are about a dozen subspecies of Eurasian eagle-owl. With a total range in Europe and Asia of about 32 million square kilometres (12 million square miles) and a total population estimated to be between 250 thousand and 2.5 million individuals, the IUCN lists the bird’s conservation status as being of “least concern”.

Eagle owl 2

September Changes: Gallery and a Poem by : Jessica Millsaps

A September Landscape, County Kilkenny, Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

A September Landscape,
County Kilkenny,
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

September is in full flow here in County Kilkenny and Autumn is just around the corner, we have had very dry weather for most of the month yet this could be about to change.

I love the month of September very much and one of my favourite poems about the month is by , Jessica Millsaps .

September Changes

By : Jessica Millsaps

September is like no other
It’s days change color and weather
No other month can say quite the same
For every day, I can feel the change

It’s cool breezes start out warm,
Changing to cold throughout every storm
The leaves change and fall
As the Summer leaves and Autumn kisses us all

September Kilkenny Landscape 1.

September maidens feel the change
Like the blue of the sky
Yet the color so deep
Unbelievable beauty

Maidens fall throughout and watch
Each raindropp changing through colors so fast
Yet one streak remains the same
Of that wonderful sapphire rain.

September, unlike any other
Holds you tight, in any weather.
Changes come, no matter where you go

September Kilkenny Landscape 3.

North and you’ll get stormy snow
South and feel the heat of summer coming
September does this, no matter what.
Change lives within, Nothing to stop

September is beautiful
And awesome all the same
It’s hope for the future and the change
Comes swiftly as we sweep away

The Summer ends and the Autumn begins
Change is all around
With one maiden leaving
And yet, another comes

September_Panorama 1

Born into the world
Of wonderful September
The sapphire skies live on
Through out this wonderful September

The secret Cove , Image and poem

Secret Cove Padstow bay

Secret Cove Padstow bay,
Cornwall,
Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

Secret Cove

I took my breath from a sea breeze
on its way to somewhere else.

I could sense where it had been
where summer is almost over
Beyond the cliff above the sea

A secret cove where spirits swim
a place no one ever sees

Timeless souls, their presence is felt
their breath upon the breeze.

The Sail boat , Images and then a poem by : Lee Shetzline

The Sail boat 2
Sail Boat with red sail
Brownsea Island
Poole Harbour, Poole, Dorset
Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

The Sail boat on the Water

By : Lee Shetzline

Crisp triangle of red sail,
Standing to attention like tin soldiers,
Solitary and glowing
Amidst the thick blue smudges of water

One drop of color
Accidentally spilled onto an endless Sea
Too wonderful to remove

The Sail boat 1

Irish Photography : Galesquarter Church and Castle, Co. Laois – Gallery

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 8
Galesquarter Church, Co. Laois
Irish Landscape Photography : Nigel Borrington

The Old Castle and church at Galesquarter, Co. Laois was home to the Lords of Upper Ossary the Gaelic Fitzpatrick family (Irish: Mac Gìolla Phádraig) .

The two buildings has stood empty since the 1700’s and today are very much in ruins yet go to make a wonderful site in the Local Landscape.

The Gallery below was taken last weekend on a walk through Galesquarter ending in the Bunlacken hills above.

Galesquarter Church and Castle, Co. Laois : Gallery

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 1

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 2

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 3

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 4

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 5

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 6

Barrackquarter county Kilkenny 7

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,192 other followers

%d bloggers like this: